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Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Safari Will Disable TLS 1.0 and 1.1 in 2020

All major web browsers, including Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, and Mozilla Firefox, altogether today announced to soon remove support for TLS 1.0 (20-year-old) and TLS 1.1 (12-year-old) communication encryption protocols.

Developed initially as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol, Transport Layer Security (TLS) is an updated cryptographic protocol used to establish a secure and encrypted communications channel between clients and servers.

There are currently four versions of the TLS protocol—TLS 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 (latest)—but older versions, TLS 1.0 and 1.1, are known to be vulnerable to a number of critical attacks, such as POODLE and BEAST.

According to Google regarding TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1:

TLS (Transport Layer Security) is the protocol which secures HTTPS. It has a long history stretching back to the nearly twenty-year-old TLS 1.0 and its even older predecessor, SSL. Over that time, we have learned a lot about how to build secure protocols.

TLS 1.2 was published ten years ago to address weaknesses in TLS 1.0 and 1.1 and has enjoyed wide adoption since then. Today only 0.5% of HTTPS connections made by Chrome use TLS 1.0 or 1.1. These old versions of TLS rely on MD5 and SHA-1, both now broken, and contain other flaws. TLS 1.0 is no longer PCI-DSS compliant and the TLS working group has adopted a document to deprecate TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1.

According to Microsoft regarding TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1:

January 19th of next year marks the 20th anniversary of TLS 1.0, the inaugural version of the protocol that encrypts and authenticates secure connections across the web. Over the last 20 years, successor versions of TLS have grown more advanced, culminating with the publication of TLS 1.3, which is currently in development for a future version of Microsoft Edge.

Two decades is a long time for a security technology to stand unmodified. While we aren’t aware of significant vulnerabilities with our up-to-date implementations of TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1, vulnerable third-party implementations do exist. Moving to newer versions helps ensure a more secure Web for everyone. Additionally, we expect the IETF to formally deprecate TLS 1.0 and 1.1 later this year, at which point protocol vulnerabilities in these versions will no longer be addressed by the IETF.

For these reasons, sites should begin to move off of TLS 1.0 and 1.1 as soon as is practical. Newer versions enable more modern cryptography and are broadly supported across modern browsers.

According to Apple regarding TLS 1.0 and 1.1

Transport Layer Security (TLS) is a critical security protocol used to protect web traffic. It provides confidentiality and integrity of data in transit between clients and servers exchanging (often sensitive) information. To best safeguard this data, it is important to use modern and more secure versions of this protocol. Specifically, applications should move away from TLS 1.0 and 1.1. Doing so provides many benefits, including:

  • Modern cryptographic cipher suites and algorithms with desirable performance and security properties, e.g., perfect forward secrecy and authenticated encryption, that are not vulnerable to attacks such as BEAST.
  • Removal of mandatory and insecure SHA-1 and MD5 hash functions as part of peer authentication.
  • Resistance to downgrade-related attacks such as LogJam and FREAK.

Now is the time to make this transition. Properly configured for App Transport Security (ATS)compliance, TLS 1.2 offers security fit for the modern web. It is the standard on Apple platforms and represents 99.6% of TLS connections made from Safari. TLS 1.0 and 1.1 — which date back to 1999 — account for less than 0.36% of all connections. With the recent finalization of TLS 1.3 by the IETF in August 2018, the proportion of legacy TLS connections will likely drop even further. TLS 1.2 is also required for HTTP/2, which delivers significant performance improvements for the web.

Therefore, we are deprecating support for TLS 1.0 and 1.1. Complete support will be removed from Safari in updates to Apple iOS and macOS beginning in March 2020. FirefoxChrome, and Edge are also planning to drop TLS 1.0 and 1.1 support at that time. If you own or operate a web server that does not support TLS 1.2 or newer, please upgrade now. If you use legacy services or devices that cannot be upgraded, please let us know by contacting our Web Technologies Evangelist or by filing a bug report with details.

According to Mozilla regarding TLS 1.0 and 1.1

In March of 2020, Firefox will disable support for TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1.

On the Internet, 20 years is an eternity.  TLS 1.0 will be 20 years old in January 2019.  In that time, TLS has protected billions – and probably trillions – of connections from eavesdropping and attack.

In that time, we have collectively learned a lot about what it takes to design and build a security protocol.

Though we are not aware of specific problems with TLS 1.0 that require immediate action, several aspects of the design are neither as strong or as robust as we would like given the nature of the Internet today.  Most importantly, TLS 1.0 does not support modern cryptographic algorithms.

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) no longer recommends the use of older TLS versions.  A draft document describes the technical reasons in more detail.

We will disable TLS 1.1 at the same time.  TLS 1.1 only addresses a limitation of TLS 1.0 that can be addressed in other ways. Our telemetry shows that only 0.1% of connections use TLS 1.1.

Our telemetry shows that many sites already use TLS 1.2 or higher (Qualys says 94%).  TLS 1.2 is a prerequisite for HTTP/2, which can improve site performance.  We recommend that sites use a modern profile of TLS 1.2 unless they have specialized needs.

For sites that need to upgrade, the recently released TLS 1.3 includes an improved core design that has been rigorously analyzed by cryptographers.  TLS 1.3 can also make connections faster than TLS 1.2. Firefox already makes far more connections with TLS 1.3 than with TLS 1.0 and 1.1 combined.

Be aware that these changes will appear in pre-release versions of Firefox (Beta, Developer Edition, and Nightly) earlier than March 2020.  We will announce specific dates when we have more detailed plans.

 

All the tech companies recommended websites that do not support TLS 1.2 or newer to move off of the old versions of the protocol as soon as possible and is practical.

Furthermore, the PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) compliance also requires websites to disable SSL/TLS 1.0 implementation by June 30, 2018.



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